Our Story

Learn our story, from the beginning and into the future.

Ever since we opened our gates we have approached life (and death) differently. While some just see the end of a loved one’s life as a time for grief and mourning, we prefer to think of it as a time for reflection, appreciation and even celebration. This is evident in everything we do, from the way we conduct our services to the amenities we choose to offer. We are not a burial ground. We are a close knit community dedicated to honoring, sharing and preserving the amazing and inspirational stories that are life.

 
 
101
years in business
 
 

Why Us?

In a nutshell? Experience, professionalism, compassion, and empathy.

Why Us?

We've learned a lot over many years. Like how to present options without overwhelming. And how to meet the needs of many caring parties. People come to us in difficult times, and we respond kindness, calmness and expertise. Our goal is to create a beautiful occasion and make you feel welcome, always. We spend our days planning with families. We stay up to date with industry developments. And we make hard times a little easier.

Learn the legacy.

Thomas B. Farmer homesteaded near Exeter, Nebraska in 1869. He farmed, but soon began to use his ability with wood and construction. For many years he was the only contractor in Exeter and built the first school and some of the current Methodist Church. He also built many of the old barns that still stand around the community of Exeter. He was soon asked if he would make coffins and assist in preparing bodies for burial. 

His son, Pauley R. Farmer, saw the work his father did and went to mortuary school. In 1917 he established a licensed funeral home (and furniture store) on the east side of the north end of Main Street in Exeter. In 1927, he moved the funeral business and began operating the Farmer Funeral Home at its current location in Exeter. 

Two of his four children became funeral directors. Burton W. Farmer, the oldest son, and Paul H. Farmer, the youngest son. Pauley R. Farmer was killed in an automobile accident just east of McCool on the old U.S. 81 in 1935. At the time of his death, Burton was licensed and was assisting his father. Paul was in college and later, in 1937, returned to Exeter and helped in running the Farmer Funeral Home with his brother, with help from their Mother. Burton left the business for a short period of time to move to Kansas City and Paul continued to operate the family business for their mother Ellen (Nellie Delaney) Farmer. 

When Paul was drafted in 1941, Burton and his wife Loy returned home and operated the business. Their Mother died in 1946. That year Burton and Loy purchased the Farmer Funeral Home from the family. Burton and Loy (and their daughter Connie) lived in the funeral home, sharing their home and their lives with those who had lost loved ones. Loy was most active in the operation of the funeral home. Upon returning from the WWII, Paul H. moved to Geneva and ran a hardware business for a short time before purchasing the Hrusbesky Funeral Home at it's current location or 242 North 10th Street, Geneva, Nebraska. 

Burton died in 1977 and in March of 1978 Loy sold the funeral home in Exeter to her nephew P. R. Farmer, a licensed embalmer and funeral director, who was in practice with his father in Geneva, Nebraska. Current owners include P.R. Farmer, John R. Brower and Shaun P. Farmer. 

Who We Are

Meet our staff. Members of the local community make everything that happens possible.
Together, we make this place amazing.

Shaun P. Farmer

Shaun P. Farmer

President
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Michael J. Brower

Michael J. Brower

Vice President
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Kevin  Perrien

Kevin Perrien

Funeral Director
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Paul R.  Farmer

Paul R. Farmer

Retired
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John R.  Brower

John R. Brower

Retired
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Paul H.  Farmer

Paul H. Farmer

1912-1991
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Our locations.

See where we are and find the place that best meets your needs.